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KevinP
04-04-2008, 06:40 PM
Hi all,

I was poking around on the internet and found this:

http://www.polecataerospace.com/nike_smoke_10.htm

That page is copyrighted in '03, but do people actually FLY model rockets that are 11' long???

:eek:

Rocket Doctor
04-04-2008, 06:49 PM
Hi all,

I was poking around on the internet and found this:

http://www.polecataerospace.com/nike_smoke_10.htm

That page is copyrighted in '03, but do people actually FLY model rockets that are 11' long???

:eek:

Yes, and longer and bigger. That's High Power Rocketry....

KevinP
04-04-2008, 06:55 PM
Ho---ly-----cow.

I actually checked out the rest of their website. They have some really big ones. I like the Phoenix that they had, but good grief. It has to be expensive to fly and I'm sure you can't just go out in an open field and launch the thing. I have read where clubs are cleared up to certain altitudes. I guess with those it would take quite a clearance indeed.

It would be fun to watch, though. :)

Rocketflyer
04-04-2008, 10:00 PM
Ho---ly-----cow.

I actually checked out the rest of their website. They have some really big ones. I like the Phoenix that they had, but good grief. It has to be expensive to fly and I'm sure you can't just go out in an open field and launch the thing. I have read where clubs are cleared up to certain altitudes. I guess with those it would take quite a clearance indeed.

It would be fun to watch, though. :)

Yep, fun it is, and it can get expensive. Learn all you can about the powered rockets up to "G" power, and how to build solidly. Get a Low Explosive Users Permit (LEUP), or get a club member to purchase a motor for you and certify when you think you are ready. Welcome to the forum and to the hobby. Answers to questions spoken here by some very knowledgable people.

tbzep
04-04-2008, 11:03 PM
Hi all,

I was poking around on the internet and found this:

http://www.polecataerospace.com/nike_smoke_10.htm

That page is copyrighted in '03, but do people actually FLY model rockets that are 11' long???

:eek:

Before I built my Semroc Aerobee Hi this past year, I built and flew a 12.5 foot tall Aerobee Hi at LDRS XV in 1996. :D

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y283/tbzep/AEROBEHI.jpg

sandman
04-04-2008, 11:31 PM
There was a web site by the Gates brothers but it's down now so I don't know what happened to it but...they were building a 1/10th scale Saturn 1B.

That would make the capsule and escape tower alone 4 feet tall

This was going to fly on I think 8 "M" class motors.

I was at Public Missile with Carl Tulanko from TRF and PML had one of the carbon fiber body tube.

It looked like a culvert pipe! :eek:

barone
04-05-2008, 07:27 AM
Before I built my Semroc Aerobee Hi this past year, I built and flew a 12.5 foot tall Aerobee Hi at LDRS XV in 1996. :D

http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y283/tbzep/AEROBEHI.jpg
OOooooooooooohhhhhhh......look at the pretty sparkler! :D

Arley Davis
04-07-2008, 09:04 AM
Personally, I have been flying mid and High Power Rockets for many years. And to fly and build high power rockets can be fun, but very expensive. If you wish to see the big rockets fly you need to go to an LDRS Launch. Here is a Photo of my club the THORís 1/3rd Scale Mercury Redstone in which it cathode on itís maiden flight many years ago at an LDRS Launch.
Most all very large High power rockets are Group Projects Because of the cost and building it as will as you need help getting it to the launch sit and setting it up as will as retrieving it. Rockets this large can weight Hundreds of pounds. Also one of your members needs to be Level 3 certified.

Doug Sams
04-07-2008, 10:11 AM
Ho---ly-----cow.

I actually checked out the rest of their website. They have some really big ones. I like the Phoenix that they had, but good grief. It has to be expensive to fly and I'm sure you can't just go out in an open field and launch the thing. I have read where clubs are cleared up to certain altitudes. I guess with those it would take quite a clearance indeed.Kevin,

Returning to my earlier post, with your location near Ft Hood, all of the clubs you may fly with (DARS, AARG, HOTROC) include high power, so you can see all kinds of this stuff up close.

BTW, please don't be intimidated. Most of us can't afford to fly too much HPR. My flying is easily 15:1 or 20:1 MR to HPR. But I do take advantage of the FAA waivers the clubs have so I can fly the bigger stuff when my wallet allows :)

But even just watching is fun. Seeing an M-to-M stager is pretty impressive. But staging an F to an F can be just as technically challenging (and a lot more affordable :) ).

Anyway, no matter what's being flown at a club launch, it's great to get out and fly. You will see folks draw just as much interest with a Saturn V at the model rails as with an M shot to 15,000 feet. People appreciate the time invested and skills required to build rockets, so they know what's at risk when the button gets pushed. We all have an unbuilt Saturn V in our stashes that we're afraid of crashing someday, so we watch with keen interest whenever someone else steps up to fly one.

Hopefully we can meet at one of the upcoming DARS launches in McGregor this year.

Doug


.

Arley Davis
04-07-2008, 10:16 AM
To fly these bigger rockets you need to first be a member of TRIPOLI or NAR and it would also become very wise to join a Local High Power club. Next you need to become certified to purchase and fly High power rockets. First you need to get your level 1 certification by building a level 1 rocket and flying it successfully on an H motor, of cores you need a Level 2 rocketeer to purchase the motor for you and sign of on you papers that the flight was successful. Once you have your Level 1 certification you can fly H an I as Long as you can get someone that is certified to purchase and watch you fly, To purchase Motors and fly for yourself you need to get a Low Explosive Users Permit (LEUP) as roketflyer had said.
To become Level 2 certified you need to have your Level 1 certification of course, and then follow the steps above as will as take a level 2 test. Next you need to fly this rocket on a J motor, Once you have your Level 2 certification you can use J, K and L motors.
To get Level 3 is very hard and also very expensive, anywhere from 500 dollars and much more. Also keep in mind the larger rockets have a lower success rate, someone once told me 60 to 70 percent rate of success. And you also need to have a TAP member to sign off on your flight for one thing. You will need documentation with photoís showing your construction with the Center of Pursuer and Center of Gravity shown on the papers. As any rocketeer should know for a rocket to fly stable the Center of Gravity has to be above of the Center of Pursuer or the rocket will crash. You need of course to fly an M motor, and the rocket has to perform the way itís supposed to. And one more note you have to use electronic ejection, for M motors and above do not use motor ejection.

One more note you have to have an FAA waiver to fly High power rockets, so itís best to go to Local Launches were the Waiver is already taken care of.

On a personal note I am Level 2 certified, as will, as was my Daughter. I certified using my Pterodactyl, and Candy using her 1/5th scale Zoom Broom, Shown here with my 1/3rd scale Andromeda. Also My Grandson Jacob with my (or as he says my Rocket Grandpa), the Praying Mantis, taken 3 years ago.

Rocket Doctor
04-07-2008, 12:13 PM
To fly these bigger rockets you need to first be a member of TRIPOLI or NAR and it would also become very wise to join a Local High Power club. Next you need to become certified to purchase and fly High power rockets. First you need to get your level 1 certification by building a level 1 rocket and flying it successfully on an H motor, of cores you need a Level 2 rocketeer to purchase the motor for you and sign of on you papers that the flight was successful. Once you have your Level 1 certification you can fly H an I as Long as you can get someone that is certified to purchase and watch you fly, To purchase Motors and fly for yourself you need to get a Low Explosive Users Permit (LEUP) as roketflyer had said.
To become Level 2 certified you need to have your Level 1 certification of course, and then follow the steps above as will as take a level 2 test. Next you need to fly this rocket on a J motor, Once you have your Level 2 certification you can use J, K and L motors.
To get Level 3 is very hard and also very expensive, anywhere from 500 dollars and much more. Also keep in mind the larger rockets have a lower success rate, someone once told me 60 to 70 percent rate of success. And you also need to have a TAP member to sign off on your flight for one thing. You will need documentation with photoís showing your construction with the Center of Pursuer and Center of Gravity shown on the papers. As any rocketeer should know for a rocket to fly stable the Center of Gravity has to be above of the Center of Pursuer or the rocket will crash. You need of course to fly an M motor, and the rocket has to perform the way itís supposed to. And one more note you have to use electronic ejection, for M motors and above do not use motor ejection.

One more note you have to have an FAA waiver to fly High power rockets, so itís best to go to Local Launches were the Waiver is already taken care of.

On a personal note I am Level 2 certified, as will, as was my Daughter. I certified using my Pterodactyl, and Candy using her 1/5th scale Zoom Broom, Shown here with my 1/3rd scale Andromeda. Also My Grandson Jacob with my (or as he says my Rocket Grandpa), the Praying Mantis, taken 3 years ago.

Arley

Haven't seen you on here for awhile, how are you doing?

RD

Mark II
04-07-2008, 01:41 PM
Hi all,

I was poking around on the internet and found this:

http://www.polecataerospace.com/nike_smoke_10.htm

That page is copyrighted in '03, but do people actually FLY model rockets that are 11' long???

:eek:
If you haven't seen it already, here is a KIT for a FULL-SIZED replica of the Nike Smoke:

http://www.performancerocketry.com/nikesmoke16.html

Have you got 3 large to spend on a rocket kit? ;)

Mark

Royatl
04-07-2008, 04:23 PM
If you haven't seen it already, here is a KIT for a FULL-SIZED replica of the Nike Smoke:

http://www.performancerocketry.com/nikesmoke16.html

Have you got 3 large to spend on a rocket kit? ;)

Mark

Just noticed their full scale ARCAS and Astrobee-D fin cans! Cool!

Arley Davis
04-11-2008, 06:01 AM
Will Rocket Doctor
I have been having some problems, and believe me raising a 7 Year old grandson by myself at my age is not easy, especially one that has ADHD, put heís still my boy.

Also itís been hard because of my Disability, I am considered Legally blind, I have 20/70 vision, so I can not get to High Power launches, or finding someone to take us to our club meetings for I am not allowed to drive at night. The worst thank is Itís hard to work on rockets, put with a magnifying glass I get by.

A couple of months ago I finished the Estes Stealth, as will as some of the easy Estes rockets. The Canaroc Warlock I put on hold after it was broken in the move. I have been working on a clone of the Centuri E.S.S. Raven, super kit, and the Estes Orbital Transport re-release kit that came out a couple of years ago.
I would take some pictures put I donít have a camera, and what good would it be with my eyesight, maybe I can talk my brother into taking some pictures for me then I can post them in Ye Old rocket shop.

Here is a photo sent to me, taken last year at one of our clubís Low Power launches, Jacob and me our on the right.

Rocket Doctor
04-11-2008, 07:42 AM
Great photo Arley
Good luck with your rocketry projects and when you can post more pics

RD

jsdemar
04-20-2008, 11:46 PM
That page is copyrighted in '03, but do people actually FLY model rockets that are 11' long???

Here are some photos of the 11ft tall, 6" dia IQSY Tomahawk I scratch-built for my NAR L3 flight (AMW M1350WW motor)...
http://photos.thrustgear.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=8

I still fly lots of smaller rockets too. :)

-John DeMar

Rocket Doctor
04-21-2008, 05:11 AM
Here are some photos of the 11ft tall, 6" dia IQSY Tomahawk I scratch-built for my NAR L3 flight (AMW M1350WW motor)...
http://photos.thrustgear.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=8

I still fly lots of smaller rockets too. :)

-John DeMar

Yes they do and some even larger in height and diameter. That's what high power rocketry is all about.

Mark II
04-21-2008, 06:44 PM
Here are some photos of the 11ft tall, 6" dia IQSY Tomahawk I scratch-built for my NAR L3 flight (AMW M1350WW motor)...
http://photos.thrustgear.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=8

I still fly lots of smaller rockets too. :)

-John DeMar
Great rocket! :cool: OK, so let's have the details. Scale? LOW? Avionics? Max altitude of your L3 flight? Terms of the 3rd mortgage that you took out to finance it? :D

Mark

jsdemar
04-21-2008, 08:28 PM
Great rocket! :cool: OK, so let's have the details. Scale? LOW? Avionics? Max altitude of your L3 flight? Terms of the 3rd mortgage that you took out to finance it? :D

It's around 2/3rds Scale and about 40 pounds without motor. For electronics, I used an RDAS and a Perferctflite MAWD. Altitude was 6500ft, 9.5g's, 700mph max. I flew it at NYPOWER in Geneseo, NY with the old rocket gang last July (my son and I drove there from NM!).

I started working on it in 2002 when I lived near Syracuse, NY. Here's a webpage I did back then... http://thrustgear.com/IQSY/html/

Some of the parts I got through bartering. The nosecone was $70. Tubes were from PML and Giant Leap. The 10ft parachute is a $30 "play chute" (like kids use in a gym, with handles on it). Dave at Quickburst.net sewed the extension lines on for me. I also got the deployment bag and chute protectors from Quickburst.

The motor casing was loaned from AMW. I got an Aerotech reload from a friend here in Las Cruces (bartered), but when I got to NYPOWER, the AMW guys swapped it for an M1350WW motor. It was a low-key prep and flight. Last flight of the weekend just before the waiver closed. I guess this goes back to my NAR contest flying days where I'd usually end up procrastinating and making the last flight of the event. ;)

The paint job isn't quite finished, so I'll work on that this Spring and try an encore (with an EX motor, to save some money).

-John DeMar

Green Dragon
04-21-2008, 11:47 PM
Here are some photos of the 11ft tall, 6" dia IQSY Tomahawk I scratch-built for my NAR L3 flight (AMW M1350WW motor)...
http://photos.thrustgear.com/cpg/thumbnails.php?album=8

I still fly lots of smaller rockets too. :)

-John DeMar

John

IS that conical cone made from a mold ? or glassed over a foam plug or similar ?

if made from a mold that still exists, any chance of aquiring one, lol .... one of the things keeps putting me off on my original L# ( full scale BB3 ) is the nose.. although I now have a foam one 80% ready for glassing, just I'm no expert on glassing ( yet or ever, lol - that's what our Rattler 7 was for, glass practice, funny how the ugly / quick and dirty ones become favorites / icons :)

~ AL

( who does have a 'backup' L3 in the works, might fly by NYPower or maybe NARAM 50 .. depends on my work ethic, which is not always good, lol :D )

tbzep
04-21-2008, 11:56 PM
John

IS that conical cone made from a mold ? or glassed over a foam plug or similar ?

if made from a mold that still exists, any chance of aquiring one, lol .... one of the things keeps putting me off on my original L# ( full scale BB3 ) is the nose.. although I now have a foam one 80% ready for glassing, just I'm no expert on glassing ( yet or ever, lol - that's what our Rattler 7 was for, glass practice, funny how the ugly / quick and dirty ones become favorites / icons :)

~ AL

( who does have a 'backup' L3 in the works, might fly by NYPower or maybe NARAM 50 .. depends on my work ethic, which is not always good, lol :D )

Al,

You don't have to get the glassing perfect. Cut your foam slightly smaller in dia. than what you need. Apply the glass/resin (or epoxy).

Trim/rough sand any stuff that's sticking up. Get a can of bondo and use it in a similar fashion that you would use Fill-n-Finish on a balsa nosecone. If the diameter is still a little on the small side, more Bondo can be added to get it to spec.

My 1/2 scale Aerobee Hi nosecone came out nice and the bondo was easy to shape and slick up for painting considering that's its purpose for car bodies. :)

jsdemar
04-22-2008, 12:12 AM
IS that conical cone made from a mold ? or glassed over a foam plug or similar ?

Al,

The big conical in one of the pictures is a 10.5" dia 5:1 conical made by ScotGlas. He's got a big mold and doesn't make them very often ($350 list). I bought it to make a full scale UP Aerospace SpaceLoft XL, but my project partner(s) have backed out. Here's what the real rocket looks like (first flight to space from NM Spaceport)...
http://www.rocketryonline.com/rolpresents/index.php?site=up
You might recognize Bruce Lee in those pictures.

I'll probably put the cone up for auction somewhere online.

-John

Mark II
04-22-2008, 01:37 AM
Al,

You don't have to get the glassing perfect. Cut your foam slightly smaller in dia. than what you need. Apply the glass/resin (or epoxy).

Trim/rough sand any stuff that's sticking up. Get a can of bondo and use it in a similar fashion that you would use Fill-n-Finish on a balsa nosecone. If the diameter is still a little on the small side, more Bondo can be added to get it to spec.

My 1/2 scale Aerobee Hi nosecone came out nice and the bondo was easy to shape and slick up for painting considering that's its purpose for car bodies. :)
Yeah, but now the nose cone shell is 3" thick on one side, and 4" thick on the other side, right?

Mark <grinning and ducking>

tbzep
04-22-2008, 07:08 AM
Yeah, but now the nose cone shell is 3" thick on one side, and 4" thick on the other side, right?

Mark <grinning and ducking>

Well....it could be if he's that bad at glassing. :eek: :p