Ye Olde Rocket Forum

Go Back   Ye Olde Rocket Forum > The Golden Age of Model Rocketry > Model Rocket History
User Name
Password
Auctions Register FAQ Members List Calendar Today's Posts Search Mark Forums Read


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #171  
Old 10-06-2007, 05:21 PM
shockwaveriderz shockwaveriderz is offline
rocket dinosaur
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 771
Red face

don't hold your breath waiting for Bob Craddock to help you with anything at the Smithsonian..... He is the person in charge of ANY model rocketry collection that they may have and he guards it like it is Ft. Knox.

The only things I ever got was a photo of the original estes astron spaceplane and a very poor photo of the carlisle mark -1 rock-a chute.

Bob is also a collector of sorts of model rocketry stuff.... if you peruse RMR on the name Bob Craddock you will find a lot of pro and con about the man.

Its my understanding that the STine collection was returned to Bill Stine some time ago., Because all the Smithsonian wanted to do with it was "store" it, never to see the light of day again. Thats one reason Bill did his mini-show at the seattle museum of flight.


The people that I know of who have very large model rocketry collections, not just models, but anything that might have to do with it, is Randy Lieberman and Mark Mayfield. Randy sold a large portion of his collection to Mark. Randy also holds things pretty close to his vest too. Mark on the other hand, has been very open about his collection, at least to me.

SInce there will never probbaly be any major model rocketry exhibit at the Smithsonian, I suggested to various people that perhaps they might consider creating a digital archive and then posting it to the web. To access it you would have to pay a membership fee, with the membership fees going to future perservaytion of model rocketry artifacts.

This way everybody in the world could peruse the digital archive. The idea is that it would encompass the Stine archive, the Estes archive and any personal collectors stuff. Anybody would be able to donate items in the terms of a photograph,etc.

I also thought that since you can now do 3-D on the web pretty easily, that certain artifacts be photographed(?) in 3D so people could get a feel for the real thing.

terry dean
nar 16158
__________________
"Old Rocketeer's don't die; they just go OOP"
Reply With Quote
  #172  
Old 10-06-2007, 07:21 PM
ARTU's Avatar
ARTU ARTU is offline
Space Cowboy
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 74
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shockwaveriderz
don't hold your breath waiting for Bob Craddock to help you with anything at the Smithsonian..... He is the person in charge of ANY model rocketry collection that they may have and he guards it like it is Ft. Knox.

The only things I ever got was a photo of the original estes astron spaceplane and a very poor photo of the carlisle mark -1 rock-a chute.

Bob is also a collector of sorts of model rocketry stuff.... if you peruse RMR on the name Bob Craddock you will find a lot of pro and con about the man.

Its my understanding that the STine collection was returned to Bill Stine some time ago., Because all the Smithsonian wanted to do with it was "store" it, never to see the light of day again. Thats one reason Bill did his mini-show at the seattle museum of flight.


The people that I know of who have very large model rocketry collections, not just models, but anything that might have to do with it, is Randy Lieberman and Mark Mayfield. Randy sold a large portion of his collection to Mark. Randy also holds things pretty close to his vest too. Mark on the other hand, has been very open about his collection, at least to me.

SInce there will never probbaly be any major model rocketry exhibit at the Smithsonian, I suggested to various people that perhaps they might consider creating a digital archive and then posting it to the web. To access it you would have to pay a membership fee, with the membership fees going to future perservaytion of model rocketry artifacts.

This way everybody in the world could peruse the digital archive. The idea is that it would encompass the Stine archive, the Estes archive and any personal collectors stuff. Anybody would be able to donate items in the terms of a photograph,etc.

I also thought that since you can now do 3-D on the web pretty easily, that certain artifacts be photographed(?) in 3D so people could get a feel for the real thing.

terry dean
nar 16158


Thanks for the info Terry,

this might also be why Wright Patterson Air Force base has a a better Air Force and Space Museum then the Smithsonian even.

A whole new space and missle building was finished a year ago, now I got to do drive down and see it.
__________________
Art Upton
I am an original AR; pronounce like a pirate says "R"
An AR is an Always Rocketeer, in differance to BAR; although I like to visit BARs now and then.
Reply With Quote
  #173  
Old 10-06-2007, 11:31 PM
al_packer al_packer is offline
Old Fogey
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 57
Default

I have a couple of things I'd like to go to a "real" museum--I'd just as soon not have them get into the hands of a collector where they are bought and sold speculatively like tulip bulbs in 17th century Holland. Likewise, if they go to my "heirs and assigns" they're likely to eventually end up in a dumpster as "just some old model junk".

Unfortunately, museum directors come and go, and often a model rocketry-friendly individual is replaced by someone with an entirely different agenda.

Soooooooooooooo I'd like to hear more thoughts on the subject of a trustworthy model rocket museum.

Bill
Reply With Quote
  #174  
Old 10-06-2007, 11:47 PM
CraigF CraigF is offline
Re-BAR
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Toronto area, Canada
Posts: 81
Default

There is no "trustworthy" museum. Any significant one has tons of stuff not on display. We could go way OT here, but PC and politics prevents much important stuff from being displayed. Plus the reasons you mentioned. Never mind budgets for preservation and space for proper display etc.

For MR stuff, I think the best we can hope for is if somebody (the Estes??) leave a trust for something, in perpetuity. In some of my other hobbies, it is only due to the wealth of significant individuals that items are displayed at all, though the Smithsonian displays a few when ~200 years old and obviously of some "national historical significance".

Bob Craddock...he sure could be a pretty crusty guy sometimes. Especially when people weren't offering enough for the (vintage) kits he was selling, LOL! Very knowledgable of course, but always seemed reticent about giving out the "rest of the story", you always knew he was holding stuff back. That is probably good in some ways, least for the bureaucratic mindset, makes you seem "indispensible". He helped me numerous times on projects, I miss the guy.
Reply With Quote
  #175  
Old 10-07-2007, 10:48 PM
lurker01 lurker01 is offline
Craftsman
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 312
Default

So then a collection of say 2,000+ kits spanning late 1959 - ~1980, might be of some interest too the N.A.S.M. or they already have all that stuff? From Initiator001 and his picture, it sure seems to be the case.

Robert
Reply With Quote
  #176  
Old 10-07-2007, 11:26 PM
CraigF CraigF is offline
Re-BAR
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Toronto area, Canada
Posts: 81
Default

If you think about it, dispassionately, just what kind of interest would a display of kits have to the general public? Or even to us, if we couldn't pick them up and "rattle the bags" having a closer look? Since that's not likely due to their fragile nature, then access to detailed/good photographs would probably be the best we could expect, an online museum.

There are so many reasons why somebody with an extensive personal collection of rarities wouldn't want to advertise it.
Reply With Quote
  #177  
Old 10-08-2007, 12:29 AM
Initiator001's Avatar
Initiator001 Initiator001 is offline
Too Many Initiators is Never Enough
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,912
Default

Nearly 30 years ago, the NASM had a rather nice display of significant model rocketry items.

Here's a slide I took in 1979 at the NASM when they had a good model rocketry display. A Mark 1, Estes/Schutz B/G prototype, etc.

Now, they don't have anything on display at the Mall museum.

They definately have a large collection of model rocketry items. Maybe the NAR should make some sort of $$$ contribution to the Smithsonian on the condition there is a model rocket display of some sort?

Just a thought.

Bob
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:  NASM MR 1979.jpg
Views: 256
Size:  66.2 KB  
Reply With Quote
  #178  
Old 10-11-2007, 11:24 PM
ExEstesGuy ExEstesGuy is offline
It should have been a fun job???
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3
Default

Just found this site while trying to find out the status of an Estes against an ex-VP lawsuit...


Quote:
Originally Posted by ManofSteele
No, the memories would just disappoint you. What should've been the best job in the world ended up being the worst.... I'll leave it at that.
Matt


Ain't that the truth!!

I didn't get to do much rocket stuff, but add me on the designer list for:
The lightning bolt style launch pad (forgot what it was called)
Episode 1 Mini Queen's Ship, CodeName "Garrison"
Episode 1 Quene's Ship, CodeName "Wendy"
2 of the plastic 1/4A Mini's (Now called Super Shot or something)
Co-Designer of the Eagle Boost Glider
Several rockets that never made it (including one that someone just had to be paint in pink latex... )
And a bunch of airplane stuff that doesn't apply here.
Reply With Quote
  #179  
Old 11-10-2007, 04:22 PM
Rocket Doctor Rocket Doctor is offline
Master Modeler
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,400
Default

I am trying to get a listing of all the model rockets that the Smithsonian have in storage, the list of kits on display are under the Smithsonain thread below (Rocket Doctor section)

Thjey are also trying to come up with a price of a display case for a display as well, still waiting for a reply.
Reply With Quote
  #180  
Old 10-07-2018, 03:50 PM
5x7's Avatar
5x7 5x7 is offline
Sometimes collector
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 279
Default

Found this info in another thread. I would like to add John Boren's (Jumpjet) works to this thread but don't know if the original poster is still around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JumpJet
Dorffler created the Hyper Bat, Vagabond, Air Commander and Laser Lance. These were his last four models he designed for Estes

Jason created the MIRV

...
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:50 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Ye Olde Rocket Shoppe 1998-2018